CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ FOCUS: PORTRAIT OF GEORGE DYER IN A MIRROR, 1968

Francis Bacon, Portrait of George Dyer in a Mirror 1968. Oil on canvas. © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2017. All rights reserved. Catalogue Raisonné Number 68-05.

For our next ‘Catalogue Raisonné Focus’, we look at Portrait of George Dyer in a Mirror, 1968, which is currently on display at the Musée Fabre as part of their ‘Francis Bacon / Bruce Nauman. Face to Face’ exhibition.

In Portrait of George Dyer, 1967, Bacon’s diary referenced ‘George folded’ and this representation can be directly related to this portrait of George Dyer.

The smartly-attired Dyer is only a rehearsal for the image that appears in the mirror, where his head is ‘sliced and severed into two parts’.

Excerpts: Martin Harrison, FSA. 68-05 Portrait of George Dyer in a Mirror, 1968. Catalogue Raisonné Volume III, page 880-881.

If you’d like to order a copy of the ‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’ please visit Heni Publishing’s website.

CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ FOCUS: TURNING FIGURE, 1962

Francis Bacon, Turning Figure 1962. Oil on canvas. © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2017. All rights reserved. Catalogue Raisonné Number 62-11.

The next portrait to feature in our ‘Catalogue Raisonné Focus’ series is Turning Figure, 1962, which is presently on show at the Museé Fabre as part of their ‘Francis Bacon / Bruce Nauman. Face to Face’ exhibition.

The figure in this painting is more androgynous than those that feature in two similar standing female nudes, Nude, 1961, and Figure Turning, 1692. The anatomy in it doesn’t have any significant attributes that identify its gender, and only the long hair distinguishes it as female.

Excerpts: Martin Harrison, FSA. 62-11 Turning Figure, 1962, Catalogue Raisonné Volume III, page 700-701.

If you’d like to order a copy of the ‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’ please visit Heni Publishing’s website.

CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ FOCUS: THREE FIGURES AND PORTRAIT, 1975

Francis Bacon, Three Figures and Portrait, 1975. Oil and pastel on canvas. © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2015. All rights reserved.
Francis Bacon, Three Figures and Portrait, 1975. Oil, pastel, alkyd paint and sand on canvas. © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2017 All rights reserved.

Our ‘Catalogué Raisonné Focus’ series continues with Three Figures and Portrait, 1975, currently on display in the Bacon, Freud and the School of London exhibition Museo Picasso Málaga, Spain.

The painting combines three images of George Dyer, which all remain discrete entities, with the foreground featuring ‘a leering harpy / owl perched on a table’ which was ‘usually introduced by Bacon as a sign of mockery or malevolence’.

The spine, which is almost coming out of the skin of the left hand figure, can be associated with Bacon’s comment on a Degas pastel, After the Bath, Woman Drying Herself (c.1890-95, National Gallery, London). Within it the spine is referenced as having a grip and twist and that ‘you’re more conscious of the vulnerability of the rest of the body than if he had drawn the spine naturally up to the neck’. [Sylvester, pp.46-47]

The portrait pinned to the wall is that of Dyer with him also represented on the rail to the right where he appears to be either sprouting wings, or as a half-Eumenides, half-angel.

Excerpts: Martin Harrison, FSA. 75-07 Three Figures and Portrait, 1975, Catalogue Raisonné Volume IV, page 1080-1081.

If you’d like to order a copy of the ‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’ please visit Heni Publishing’s website.

CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ FOCUS: STUDY OF A BULL, 1991

Decorative image: Francis Bacon, Study of a Bull,1991.
Francis Bacon, Study of a Bull,1991. Oil, aerosol paint and dust on canvas. The Estate of Francis Bacon All rights reserved, DACS 2017. Catalogue raisonné number: 91-04

To continue our ‘Catalogué Raisonné Focus’ series, on the month of the 25th anniversary of Francis Bacon’s death, it seems apt to look back at the final painting he completed, Study of a Bull, 1991.

On the amount of dust used in the painting, Bacon expressed ‘Well, dust seems to be eternal – seems to be the one thing that lasts for ever’. A quote that has all the more significance considering his death would follow not long after this piece.

‘Bacon told Valerie Beston that he intended the painting as a homage to Federico García Lorca. It is probably also pertinent that his friend Michel Leiris, author of Miroir de la tauromachie, had died in September 1990.’

This wasn’t the first time that a bull had featured in a piece of art by Bacon, as he’d been painting bullfighters since 1969.

‘The Bull is monumental, magisterial, standing motionless and implacable at the top of the picture-field.’ ‘…a metaphorical bull-man, the noble but threatened beast with which Bacon is identifying’.

Excerpts:Martin Harrison, FSA. 91-04 Study of a Bull, 1991, Catalogue Raisonné Volume IV, page 1392.

We’ll be sharing further excerpts in the near future. If you’d like to order a copy of the ‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’ please visit Heni Publishing’s website.

CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ FOCUS: HEAD VI 1949

Decorative image: Francis Bacon, Head VI (1949)
Francis Bacon, Head VI, 1949. Oil on Canvas, © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2017. All rights reserved. Catalogue Raisonné number: 49-07.

With Francis Bacon’s Head VI 1949 currently exhibiting in the UK City of Culture 2017, Hull, it seems fitting that the revered painting be the subject of our next ‘Catalogue Raisonné Focus’.

Head VI is on display at Hull’s Ferens Art Gallery throughout the year, and until 1 May 2017 it is joined by four other works by Bacon in the display Francis Bacon: Nervous System.*

In Volume II of the Francis Bacon Catalogue Raisonné, Martin Harrisson FSA writes of Bacon’s Head VI:

‘This is the earliest surviving painting in which Bacon combined Velázquez’s Portrait of Pope Innocent X and a still image from the Odessa steps sequence in Sergei Eisenstein’s film, Battleship Potemkin. It is Bacon’s most celebrated fusion of traditional art and modernism – a Baroque masterpiece and an already-famous cinema image – a diachronic conflation that became one of his fundamental precepts.’

‘At this stage Bacon had encountered the Portrait of Pope Innocent X only in black and white reproductions, and he believed the purple and lavender of the Pope’s cape to be the correct colours; although the Velázquez obsessed Bacon for twenty years, he did not paint an accurately red Pope until 1960.’

We’ll be sharing further excerpts in the near future. If you’d like to order a copy of the ‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’ please visit Heni Publishing’s website.

 

*Please note all details including names, dates and featured works, opening days/hours are subject to change, for all confirmation please contact Ferens Art Gallery.

Excerpts: Martin Harrisson, FSA, 49-07 Head VI 1949, Francis Bacon Catalogue Raisonné Volume II, pages 202 – 205.

FRANCIS BACON TEACHING AND LEARNING RESOURCE LAUNCHED

Decorative image: Francis Bacon, Three Studies of Lucian Freud, 1969.
Francis Bacon, Three Studies of Lucian Freud, 1969. Oil on canvas. © The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved / DACS 2017. Catalogue Raisonné number: 69-07. One of four works utilised in the new ‘Francis Bacon Teaching and Learning Resource’.

“No, I don’t believe in teaching. One learns by looking. That’s what you must do, look.” – Francis Bacon

The Estate of Francis Bacon has launched its first ‘Francis Bacon Teaching and Learning Resource’, available for free to teachers, students and anyone eager to learn about the late 20th century master.

The learning resource uses four distinct works by Francis Bacon as jumping-off points for artistic and visual enquiry. Initially created to complement the Art and Design Curriculum at Key Stage 3 in the United Kingdom, it is also intended to support and inspire students and teachers of all levels.

Decorative image 'Francis Bacon Teaching and Learning Resource', page 11.
‘Francis Bacon Teaching and Learning Resource’, Study after Velázquez’s Portrait of Pope Innocent X 1953, page 11.

It can be used to encourage independent research, provide homework activities, provoke group discussions, support sketchbook work or simply invite new ways of looking at a well-known artist’s work.

Each chapter has been designed to be self-contained so that the user can either choose to read through from beginning to end or simply pick which elements are most relevant to them without the need to refer to the rest of the pack.

The four Bacon works in order of their appearance in the resource are Study after Velázquez’s Portrait of Pope Innocent X 1953, Crucifixion 1933, Three Studies of Lucian Freud 1969 and Study of a Baboon 1953.

The Estate are considering further learning resources and are eager to receive feedback. We invite users to share their thoughts with us either using the form built into the learning resource page, by emailing us at social@francis-bacon.com or via Twitter and Facebook.

FRANCISBACON.ART AND FORTHCOMING PUBLICATIONS

The Estate of Francis Bacon Publishing

We are excited to be announcing ‘The Estate of Francis Bacon Publishing’ microsite francisbacon.art, and news of our forthcoming publications.

Last year, The Estate of Francis Bacon most notably published the artist’s complete oeuvre in ‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’. Before this we had published research into Bacon’s working material, held in Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, in Francis Bacon: Metamorphoses, in 2011.

As announced on francisbacon.art, our next publications will be a series of ‘Francis Bacon Studies’, focusing on aspects of Bacon’s work in greater detail than is possible within a catalogue raisonné. The founding title, in this series edited by Martin Harrison, will be a hardback book entitled ‘Bacon and the Mind’. It will examine the artist’s work from the perspectives of neuroscience, psychology and art history. Publication dates and other information on ‘Francis Bacon Studies’ will be announced on our new microsite as the series progresses.

The 'Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné' was published 30 June 2016.
‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’ was published by The Estate of Francis Bacon on 30 June 2016.

Francisbacon.art marks the inclusion of The Estate of Francis Bacon as an ‘Early Adopter’ of the .Art domain. The address communicates a proud public statement of inclusion and position in the art world, seeing us in the company of Artists, Galleries, Museums, Art Fairs, Foundations and more.

CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ FOCUS: ‘WATERCOLOUR’ 1929

Francis Bacon, Watercolour 1929. © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2016. All rights reserved.
Francis Bacon, ‘Watercolour’ 1929. Watercolour, gouache, pencil and black ink on paper. © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2016. All rights reserved. Catalogue Raisonné number 29-01.

Early this year saw the long-awaited publication of the ‘Francis Bacon Catalogue Raisonné’. Presenting for the first time ever the entire oeuvre of Bacon’s 584 paintings, including many previously unpublished works.

The Estate of Francis Bacon is always investigating new opportunities to share the life and art of Francis Bacon, and so today is excited to begin sharing excerpts from the catalogue via this website and our Facebook and Twitter channels.

An apt starting point to initiate our ‘Francis Bacon Catalogué Raisonné Focus’ is with Bacon’s first completed painting ‘Watercolour’ 1929.

‘Bacon recalled his first encounter with the works of Picasso, which he said occurred in 1927, as a kind of epiphany, despite which several years elapsed before its impact was manifested in his paintings. The leaves at the bottom left of ‘Watercolour’ and the late-cubist forms in general were derived from Fernand Léger, the classic portico from Giorgio de Chirico, and the sections of brick wall from Jean Lurçat’s Smyrne I (1929 private collection). Bacon was aligning himself with European modernism, although the stylised diver is typical of Parisian art déco. At this stage there is little distinction between Bacon’s designs for rugs and screens and his independent art works.’ – Excerpt:Martin Harrison, FSA. 29-01 ‘Watercolour’ 1929, Catalogue Raisonné Volume II, page 108.

We’ll be sharing further excerpts in the near future. If you’d like to order a copy of the ‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’ please visit Heni Publishing’s website.

‘FRANCIS BACON: CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ’ SHORTLISTED FOR APOLLO AWARD

'Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné' on plinth
‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’

The Estate of Francis Bacon are proud to share the news that the ‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’ has been shortlisted for an Apollo Award, in the category of ‘Book of the Year’. You can see the catalogue raisonné’s entry and its fellow nominees listed on Apollo Magazine’s website.

Dating back to 1992, the Apollo Awards celebrate major achievements in the art and museum worlds. The winners of the six categories: Digital, Exhibition, Acquisition, Book, Artist and Museum, as well as the Apollo Award for Personality of the Year, will be announced on 24 November.

30 June saw the long-awaited global publication of ‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’. A landmark publishing event which presented for the first time ever the entire oeuvre of Bacon’s paintings, including many previously unpublished works. The publication containing each of Bacon’s 584 paintings, has been edited by Martin Harrison, FSA, the pre-eminent expert on Bacon’s work, alongside research assistant Dr Rebecca Daniels. An ambitious and painstaking project that has been over a decade in the making, this seminal visual document eclipses in scope any previous publication on the artist and will have a profound effect on the perception of his work. You can order an edition of the ‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’ from HENI Publishing’s website.

Francis Bacon, Landscape with Car, c. 1945-46 (46-04), as featured in 'Francis Bacon Catalogue Raisonné', © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2016. All rights reserved.
Francis Bacon, Ladscape with Car, c. 1945-46 (46-04), as featured in ‘Francis Bacon Catalogue Raisonné’, © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2016. All rights reserved.

In August, the ‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’ was delivered to the British Library and five Legal Deposit Libraries: Bodleian Library Oxford University, The Cambridge University Library, National Library of Scotland, National Library of Wales and Trinity College Dublin. The Estate of Francis Bacon will be gifting a significant number of libraries with the publication in the near future, as well as sharing excerpts on their website and social media channels, as the Estate continues to share and celebrate Francis Bacon’s art globally.

Apollo, The international Art Magazine, was Founded in 1925 and published monthly. Apollo is one of the world’s oldest and most respected magazines on the visual arts. It covers everything from antiquities to contemporary work, as well as providing in-depth discussion of the latest art news and debates; exclusive interviews with the world’s greatest collectors and artists; expert information on the market, authoritative guidance on collecting, and reviews and previews of exhibitions worldwide.

Word ref: Apollo Magazine website.

‘FRANCIS BACON: CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ’ ENTERS LIBRARIES

'Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné' on plinth
‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’ on plinth

Following its global publication on 30 June, ‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’ has now also been delivered to the British Library and five Legal Deposit Libraries: Bodleian Library Oxford University, The Cambridge University Library, National Library of Scotland, National Library of Wales and Trinity College Dublin.

The Estate of Francis Bacon will be gifting a significant number of libraries with the publication in the near future, as well as sharing excerpts on their website and social media channels, as the Estate continues to share and celebrate Francis Bacon’s art globally.

‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’ has taken over a decade to compile, with Martin Harrison, FSA, the pre-eminent expert on Bacon’s work, alongside research assistant Dr Rebecca Daniels successfully completing an ambitious project. The produced five volume publication is by far the most informative Bacon documentation, presenting the entire oeuvre of the late artist’s paintings for the first time, including over 100 previously unpublished works. You can read more on the landmark publication via our previous article here.

Francis Bacon, Landscape with Car, c. 1945-46 (46-04), as featured in 'Francis Bacon Catalogue Raisonné', © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2016. All rights reserved.
Francis Bacon, Ladscape with Car, c. 1945-46 (46-04), as featured in ‘Francis Bacon Catalogue Raisonné’, © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2016. All rights reserved.

‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné features 800 illustrations across 1,538 pages, contained within five cloth-bound hardcover volumes. Three volumes make up the study of Bacon’s entire painting oeuvre, 584 paintings prepared and printed to the quality of art prints, bookended by two further volumes: the former including an introduction and a chronology, and the latter a catalogue of Bacon’s sketches, an index, and a bibliography. Printed on 170 gsm GardaMatt Ultra stock in Bergamo, Italy at Castelli Bolis, the five volumes are boxed within a cloth-bound slipcase.

To order your copy of ‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’ please visit Heni Publishing’s website.