BROWSE AND LICENSE BACON IMAGES WITH ARTIMAGE

Decretive Image: Francis Bacon, Painting, March, 1985.
Francis Bacon, Painting, March, 1985. Oil on canvas. © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2017. All rights reserved.

You can browse and license hundreds of Francis Bacon images via the DACS resource, Artimage.

The digital image resource is curated to showcase and license exceptional works of modern and contemporary art.

Last year, Artimage worked on a major project to license materials supporting Museo Guggenheim Bilbao’s blockbuster 2016 autumn/winter exhibition, Francis Bacon: From Picasso to Velázquez.

To view all the Francis Bacon images available for license, visit the DACS resource, Artimage.

BACON ART TO FEATURE IN TATE’S 2018 SHOW

Francis Bacon, Three Figures and Portrait, 1975. Oil and pastel on canvas. © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2015. All rights reserved.
Francis Bacon, Three Figures and Portrait, 1975. Oil, pastel, alkyd paint and sand on canvas. © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2017 All rights reserved. Catalogue Raisonné number: 75-07.

From 28 February 2018 to 27 August 2018, Francis Bacon’s art will feature in the Tate Britain exhibition ‘All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life’.

The show plans to celebrate painters in Britain who found new ways of depicting people, places, feelings and relationships, capturing the sensuous immediate and intense experience of life in paint.

Art from Bacon and Freud will be showcased alongside rarely seen works by their London-based contemporaries. With artists including Michael Andrews, Frank Auerbach, R.B. Kitaj, Leon Kossoff, Paula Rego and F.N. Souza set to feature. Find out more via Tate here.

All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life’
28 February 2018 – 27 August 2018
Tate Britain, London

*Information on which Francis Bacon’s works are to be featured, will be confirmed at a later date. Please note all details including names, dates and featured works, opening days/hours are subject to change. Ahead of a visiting, we recommend contacting Tate Britain for all confirmation regarding the display.

Word ref: Tate Britain website.

CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ FOCUS: THREE FIGURES AND PORTRAIT, 1975

Francis Bacon, Three Figures and Portrait, 1975. Oil and pastel on canvas. © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2015. All rights reserved.
Francis Bacon, Three Figures and Portrait, 1975. Oil, pastel, alkyd paint and sand on canvas. © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2017 All rights reserved.

Our ‘Catalogué Raisonné Focus’ series continues with Three Figures and Portrait, 1975, currently on display in the Bacon, Freud and the School of London exhibition Museo Picasso Málaga, Spain.

The painting combines three images of George Dyer, which all remain discrete entities, with the foreground featuring ‘a leering harpy / owl perched on a table’ which was ‘usually introduced by Bacon as a sign of mockery or malevolence’.

The spine, which is almost coming out of the skin of the left hand figure, can be associated with Bacon’s comment on a Degas pastel, After the Bath, Woman Drying Herself (c.1890-95, National Gallery, London). Within it the spine is referenced as having a grip and twist and that ‘you’re more conscious of the vulnerability of the rest of the body than if he had drawn the spine naturally up to the neck’. [Sylvester, pp.46-47]

The portrait pinned to the wall is that of Dyer with him also represented on the rail to the right where he appears to be either sprouting wings, or as a half-Eumenides, half-angel.

Excerpts: Martin Harrison, FSA. 75-07 Three Figures and Portrait, 1975, Catalogue Raisonné Volume IV, page 1080-1081.

If you’d like to order a copy of the ‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’ please visit Heni Publishing’s website.

FIGURE STUDY I & II ON DISPLAY TOGETHER IN EDINBURGH

Decorative image: Figure Study I & II
Francis Bacon, Figure Study I, C. 1945-46. Oil on canvas. Figure Study II, C. 1945-46. Oil on canvas. © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2017. All rights reserved.

Francis Bacon’s Figure Study II from the Kirklees Collection is now on display free to the public at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art (Modern One) in Edinburgh, alongside its companion piece Figure Study I.

Figure Study II is one of a series of paintings from the 1940s that features visual elements such as coats, umbrellas, plants and flowers, and in this case a screaming figure – set in ambiguous interiors with an orange background. They represent the first group of works which Bacon was confident enough to exhibit, having destroyed a number of his earlier works in the 1930s.

Figure Study I was acquired by National Galleries Scotland in 1998, although despite the title, it’s only a figure study by implication, given that it’s one of the few works produced by Bacon not to feature a figure. It does, however, share the same coat motif as Figure Study II, and it has been suggested the screaming figure may be lurking under the coat waiting to emerge.

“Figure Study II is one of the greatest acquisitions the Contemporary Art Society has ever made and the first painting by Francis Bacon to enter a public collection in this country… Its display with Figure Study I offers a rare opportunity to understand the artist’s thinking across two works from a critical moment of Bacon’s career”. – Caroline Douglas, Director of the Contemporary Art Society

Figure Study II was first exhibited in London in 1946, and then purchased by the Contemporary Art Society. In 1952 when the curator of the Batley Art Gallery accepted the piece as a gift from the Contemporary Art Society on behalf of Batley, it became the second work by Bacon to enter a public collection, the first being Painting, 1946 acquired by the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

When not on loan, Figure Study II has been on permanent display at Huddersfield Art Gallery. The painting has been loaned to a number of major exhibitions in London, Australia and Japan, and has recently been part of the Invisible Rooms exhibition at Tate Liverpool which traveled to Germany’s Staatsgalerie Stuttgart.

As we approach the 25th anniversary of Francis Bacon’s death on 28 April, this is an exciting opportunity for the public to experience viewing the artist’s two works side-by-side. Presently the display is set to be in place for the remainder of 2017*. For further information please visit the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art website.

Francis Bacon’s Figure Study I and Figure Study II
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art (Modern One)
Free admission
Edinburgh, UK

Word ref: Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art press release, with special thanks to Senior Curator Grant Scanlan.
*Please note all details including names, dates and featured works, opening days/hours are subject to change. Ahead of a visiting, we recommend contacting the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art for all confirmation regarding the display.

CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ FOCUS: STUDY OF A BULL, 1991

Decorative image: Francis Bacon, Study of a Bull,1991.
Francis Bacon, Study of a Bull,1991. Oil, aerosol paint and dust on canvas. The Estate of Francis Bacon All rights reserved, DACS 2017. Catalogue raisonné number: 91-04

To continue our ‘Catalogué Raisonné Focus’ series, on the month of the 25th anniversary of Francis Bacon’s death, it seems apt to look back at the final painting he completed, Study of a Bull, 1991.

On the amount of dust used in the painting, Bacon expressed ‘Well, dust seems to be eternal – seems to be the one thing that lasts for ever’. A quote that has all the more significance considering his death would follow not long after this piece.

‘Bacon told Valerie Beston that he intended the painting as a homage to Federico García Lorca. It is probably also pertinent that his friend Michel Leiris, author of Miroir de la tauromachie, had died in September 1990.’

This wasn’t the first time that a bull had featured in a piece of art by Bacon, as he’d been painting bullfighters since 1969.

‘The Bull is monumental, magisterial, standing motionless and implacable at the top of the picture-field.’ ‘…a metaphorical bull-man, the noble but threatened beast with which Bacon is identifying’.

Excerpts:Martin Harrison, FSA. 91-04 Study of a Bull, 1991, Catalogue Raisonné Volume IV, page 1392.

We’ll be sharing further excerpts in the near future. If you’d like to order a copy of the ‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’ please visit Heni Publishing’s website.

CATALOGUE RAISONNÉ FOCUS: HEAD VI 1949

Decorative image: Francis Bacon, Head VI (1949)
Francis Bacon, Head VI, 1949. Oil on Canvas, © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2017. All rights reserved. Catalogue Raisonné number: 49-07.

With Francis Bacon’s Head VI 1949 currently exhibiting in the UK City of Culture 2017, Hull, it seems fitting that the revered painting be the subject of our next ‘Catalogue Raisonné Focus’.

Head VI is on display at Hull’s Ferens Art Gallery throughout the year, and until 1 May 2017 it is joined by four other works by Bacon in the display Francis Bacon: Nervous System.*

In Volume II of the Francis Bacon Catalogue Raisonné, Martin Harrisson FSA writes of Bacon’s Head VI:

‘This is the earliest surviving painting in which Bacon combined Velázquez’s Portrait of Pope Innocent X and a still image from the Odessa steps sequence in Sergei Eisenstein’s film, Battleship Potemkin. It is Bacon’s most celebrated fusion of traditional art and modernism – a Baroque masterpiece and an already-famous cinema image – a diachronic conflation that became one of his fundamental precepts.’

‘At this stage Bacon had encountered the Portrait of Pope Innocent X only in black and white reproductions, and he believed the purple and lavender of the Pope’s cape to be the correct colours; although the Velázquez obsessed Bacon for twenty years, he did not paint an accurately red Pope until 1960.’

We’ll be sharing further excerpts in the near future. If you’d like to order a copy of the ‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’ please visit Heni Publishing’s website.

 

*Please note all details including names, dates and featured works, opening days/hours are subject to change, for all confirmation please contact Ferens Art Gallery.

Excerpts: Martin Harrisson, FSA, 49-07 Head VI 1949, Francis Bacon Catalogue Raisonné Volume II, pages 202 – 205.

FRANCIS BACON TEACHING AND LEARNING RESOURCE LAUNCHED

Decorative image: Francis Bacon, Three Studies of Lucian Freud, 1969.
Francis Bacon, Three Studies of Lucian Freud, 1969. Oil on canvas. © The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved / DACS 2017. Catalogue Raisonné number: 69-07. One of four works utilised in the new ‘Francis Bacon Teaching and Learning Resource’.

“No, I don’t believe in teaching. One learns by looking. That’s what you must do, look.” – Francis Bacon

The Estate of Francis Bacon has launched its first ‘Francis Bacon Teaching and Learning Resource’, available for free to teachers, students and anyone eager to learn about the late 20th century master.

The learning resource uses four distinct works by Francis Bacon as jumping-off points for artistic and visual enquiry. Initially created to complement the Art and Design Curriculum at Key Stage 3 in the United Kingdom, it is also intended to support and inspire students and teachers of all levels.

Decorative image 'Francis Bacon Teaching and Learning Resource', page 11.
‘Francis Bacon Teaching and Learning Resource’, Study after Velázquez’s Portrait of Pope Innocent X 1953, page 11.

It can be used to encourage independent research, provide homework activities, provoke group discussions, support sketchbook work or simply invite new ways of looking at a well-known artist’s work.

Each chapter has been designed to be self-contained so that the user can either choose to read through from beginning to end or simply pick which elements are most relevant to them without the need to refer to the rest of the pack.

The four Bacon works in order of their appearance in the resource are Study after Velázquez’s Portrait of Pope Innocent X 1953, Crucifixion 1933, Three Studies of Lucian Freud 1969 and Study of a Baboon 1953.

The Estate are considering further learning resources and are eager to receive feedback. We invite users to share their thoughts with us either using the form built into the learning resource page, by emailing us at social@francis-bacon.com or via Twitter and Facebook.

BACON TO BE CELEBRATED WITH HISTORIC PLAQUE

Decorative image: 7 Reece Mews Studio
7 Reece Mews Studio, London, 1998. Photo: Perry Ogden © The Estate of Francis Bacon. All rights reserved.

English Heritage have announced that the life of Francis Bacon is to be celebrated with a blue plaque at 7 Reece Mews, South Kensington, London. The artist moved into the London property in 1961. It was to remain his principal home and studio until his death in 1992.

‘I am very influenced by places – by the atmosphere of a room … I just knew from the very moment that I came here that I would be able to work here.’ – Francis Bacon

The English Heritage London blue plaques scheme, which has been running for 150 years, links significant figures of the past to the buildings in which they lived and worked.

‘Francis Bacon is widely regarded as one of the most significant painters of the 20th century. His blue plaque will mark the converted stable block in South Kensington where he lived for more than 30 years. It was here that he painted some of his most celebrated works including Three Studies for a Crucifixion (1962) and Portrait of George Dyer Talking (1966).’ – English Heritage

Bacon is one of six individuals to be recognised with Blue Plaques in 2017. Other lives celebrated include; film star Charlie Chaplin, performer Sir John Gielgud, women’s rights campaigner Mary Macarthur, dancer Rudolf Nureyev and volunteering advocate Stella Lady Reading.

Decorative image - Francis Bacon National Arts Trust Fund plaque at 7 Cromwell Place.
Bacon is presently recognised with a National Arts Trust Fund plaque at former London residence 7 Cromwell Place.

Bacon is also presently recognised by two other plaques. A National Art Collections Fund plaque marks where the artist and other notable residents lived at 7 Cromwell Place, London. A Dublin Tourism plaque marks the artist’s birthplace at 63 Lower Baggot Street, Dublin.

If you’re interested in more information on Francis Bacon’s Studio, essays and photographs are available on our website. We also recommend the photography publication ‘7 Reece Mews: Francis Bacon’s Studio’.

 

Word reference: English Heritage website and the writings of John Edwards in the publication ‘7 Reece Mews: Francis Bacon’s Studio’ © The Estate of Francis Bacon.

FRANCISBACON.ART AND FORTHCOMING PUBLICATIONS

The Estate of Francis Bacon Publishing

We are excited to be announcing ‘The Estate of Francis Bacon Publishing’ microsite francisbacon.art, and news of our forthcoming publications.

Last year, The Estate of Francis Bacon most notably published the artist’s complete oeuvre in ‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’. Before this we had published research into Bacon’s working material, held in Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, in Francis Bacon: Metamorphoses, in 2011.

As announced on francisbacon.art, our next publications will be a series of ‘Francis Bacon Studies’, focusing on aspects of Bacon’s work in greater detail than is possible within a catalogue raisonné. The founding title, in this series edited by Martin Harrison, will be a hardback book entitled ‘Bacon and the Mind’. It will examine the artist’s work from the perspectives of neuroscience, psychology and art history. Publication dates and other information on ‘Francis Bacon Studies’ will be announced on our new microsite as the series progresses.

The 'Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné' was published 30 June 2016.
‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’ was published by The Estate of Francis Bacon on 30 June 2016.

Francisbacon.art marks the inclusion of The Estate of Francis Bacon as an ‘Early Adopter’ of the .Art domain. The address communicates a proud public statement of inclusion and position in the art world, seeing us in the company of Artists, Galleries, Museums, Art Fairs, Foundations and more.

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE YEAR: 2016

Francis Bacon, Triptych, 1987. Oil on canvas. © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2016. All rights reserved.
Francis Bacon, Triptych, 1987 (Catalogue raisonné number: 87-05). As exhibited earlier this year in the one-day London show ‘Francis Bacon: Six Studies in Soho’. Oil on canvas. © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2016. All rights reserved.

As the year draws to a close, we reflect on another busy twelve months celebrating the life and art of Francis Bacon.

2016 provided fantastic opportunities to view Bacon’s art. The major exhibition ‘Francis Bacon: Invisible Rooms’ displayed first at Tate Liverpool and is now on view at Germany’s Staatsgalerie Stuttgart. The Grimaldi Forum Monaco hosted the monumental show ‘Francis Bacon, Monaco and French Culture’, curated by Martin Harrison, which now displays as ‘Francis Bacon: From Picasso to Velázquez’ at Museo Guggenheim Bilbao. The Estate supported each of these four shows.

Bacon’s art was also presented in New YorkLos AngelesParis, and in UK displays in Norwich and presently York.

Ahead of the publication of the ‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’ the Estate organised a one-day, free-admission show in London entitled ‘Francis Bacon: Six Studies in Soho’. 2,200 attendees viewed not only six Francis Bacon works, but also first editions of the catalogue.

'Francis Bacon Catalogue Raisonné' was published on 30 June, © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2016. All rights reserved.
‘Francis Bacon Catalogue Raisonné’ was published on 30 June, © The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2016. All rights reserved.

30 June 2016 was a landmark date for not only everyone at the Estate but every Francis Bacon art enthusiast, as it marked the long-awaited global publication of ‘Francis Bacon: Catalogue Raisonné’. The catalogue containing each of Bacon’s 584 paintings has been edited by Martin Harrison, FSA, the pre-eminent expert on Bacon’s work, alongside research assistant Dr Rebecca Daniels. An ambitious and painstaking project that has been over ten years in the making, this seminal visual document eclipses in scope any previous publication on the artist and will have a profound effect on the perception of his work.

Image: Francis Bacon, Lying Figure, 1969. Oil on canvas. The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2016. All rights reserved.
Francis Bacon, Lying Figure, 1969. Oil on canvas. The Estate of Francis Bacon / DACS London 2016. All rights reserved. A lithograph of this painting was donated by the Estate to the Terrence Higgins Trust charity auction.

Among other supportive activities carried out by the Estate in 2016 was the opportunity to honour the memory of Christophe Dejean, who was a key member of staff at The Estate of Francis Bacon. Christophe was a long-time supporter of the Terrence Higgins Trust charity and so we donated a lithograph of Francis Bacon’s Lying Figure, 1969, to the Terrence Higgins Trust Annual Event, The Auction.

It has also been another busy year for The Francis Bacon MB Art Foundation, their highlights include performing a lecture on ‘Francis Bacon and Monaco’ with Martin Harrison, within the framework of conferences organised by the Prince Pierre Foundation of Monaco, and participation in Monaco’s first “Nuit Blanche”.

It’s an enormous pleasure to be able to share our activities via this website and our Facebook and Twitter channels. We look forward to sharing more exciting Francis Bacon news with you in 2017.

From everyone at The Estate of Francis Bacon, we wish you all a merry Christmas and a happy new year.

 

*Please note all details including featured works, display/exhibition dates and hours are subject to change, and tickets are subject to availability and access, for all confirmation please contact the hosting Gallery/Museum.